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Posts Tagged ‘case study’

Patients and bloggers often complain about their GPs’ lack of understanding of mental health, so I was interested to come across an article recently that suggests some ways in which the work of GPs (primary care) could be better aligned with mental health care.

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If you’re a therapist, how much of yourself do you invest in a session with a patient who’s hard to reach?

If you’re a patient, how much effort does your therapist make to understand what it’s like to be you?

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In a recent TED talk, an expert in the management of chronic pain in children explains neuropathic pain, a form of chronic pain in which the nervous system itself becomes faulty and creates the experience of intense pain, both the sensation of pain in the brain and the side-effects of injury in the affected (but not actually injured) part of the body.

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An animated TV documentary broadcast by the BBC illustrates some useful ideas in counselling and psychotherapy. It’s a bit creepy, too.

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One of the most important organizing principles of a person’s life, traditionally, was felt to be a clear sense of values — ideas to believe in and to be devoted to, a set of ideals more important than an individual life, which therefore could be relied upon as a way for an individual to make choices. This notion of values comes perilously close to the notion in CBT of beliefs, which have the potential to go wrong occasionally and lead an individual astray into a state of emotional disorder.

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The BABCP recently lent its support to a confused and misleading media campaign about stigma and mental health. Now it has added to the confusion by publishing an embarrassing case study showcasing the worst kind of failed CBT.

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You’ll enjoy this. No, really. Let me be clear: you will enjoy this. Otherwise there could be unpleasant consequences.

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